Ethnographic sorcery by harry west

This potentially glib proposition serves, fortunately, as a useful frame to speculate on the meanings of sorcery and participatory ethnographic fieldwork, as well as to consider the limits of symbolic anthropology.

What can West or his Muedan interlocutors possibly get wrong interpretively if Muedan sorcery is to be glossed "in In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Ethnographic Sorcery addresses several vital themes of contemporary Africanist witchcraft studies and has already attracted much scholarly attention, including a published roundtable discussion in African Studies Review Uncomfortable with this conceit, West instead offers an analysis of metaphor by calling on the insights of anthropologists, linguists, and philosophers.

University of Chicago Press, Yet this strategy, itself representative of an earlier anthropological literature a classic text being Middleton and Winter, eds. Where the eponymous monograph investigated kupilikula through the lens of contemporary local politics, Ethnographic Sorcery juxtaposes Muedan sorcery with the very ethnography that West himself carried out in Mozambique.

West challenges anthropological strategies that interpret sorcery as metaphors for something else by countering, "whose metaphor is it? He comes to endorse the perspective of phenomenologists, who assert that reality exists "only through its apperception" p.

From this unconventional and often revealing discussion of metaphor, West invokes the conventional and quite durable ontology of coexisting visible and invisible realms, which he argues comprise the key dimensions of the Muedan "lifeworld. View freely available titles: Harry West has written a short reflective follow-up to his study Kupilikula, an important ethnography of sorcery practices in the Mueda plateau of northern Mozambique during its postsocialist liberalization period in the [End Page ] s and early s.

You are not currently authenticated. Kupilikula, a Makonde-language verb meaning roughly "to invert," refers to the transcendent maneuvers of both destructive and constructive sorcerers of the Mueda plateau who create phantasms such as man-eating lions and make magical medicines in a never-ending game of one-upmanship.

Having given up on a preliminary project to study Muedan conceptions of the future, West began to investigate sorcery practices in the s by first seeking classical sociological patterns of accusations.Ethnographic Sorcery [Harry G. West] on mi-centre.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

According to the people of the Mueda plateau in northern Mozambique, sorcerers remake the world by asserting the authority of their own imaginative visions of it. /5(3). Ethnographic Sorcery - Ebook written by Harry G.

Ethnographic Sorcery

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Ethnographic sorcery

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Ethnographic Sorcery.1/5(1). Harry G. West. Ethnographic Sorcery. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, Pp. xiv + Harry West has written a short reflective follow-up to his study Kupilikula, an important ethnography of sorcery practices in the Mueda plateau of northern Mozambique during its postsocialist liberalization period in the.

In Ethnographic Sorcery, West explores the fascinating issues provoked by this equation. A key theme of West’s research into sorcery is that one sorcerer’s Price: $ Ethnographic Sorcery - Kindle edition by Harry G.

West. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Ethnographic Sorcery/5(3). The book Ethnographic Sorcery, Harry G.

West is published by University of Chicago Press.

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Ethnographic sorcery by harry west
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